Imprisonment does not change
Imprisonment does not change

Imprisonment does not change: scientists intend to change the behavior of prisoners

Imprisonment does not change

A team of Purdue scientists conducted an incredible study of the behavioral factors of people who were serving sentences for their previous crimes. The meaning of deprivation of a person's liberty is so that the offender can realize his actions, repent and, during isolation, change his attitude towards life and towards others, no longer allowing situations of violation of the law. But a new research showned the other side of the coin. In fact, imprisonment is not a treatment or reeducation.

After the sentence is completed, a person can return to his thorny path and commit new crimes. A group of scientists who discovered this tendency decided to create an algorithm to reduce recidivism and the time period after that a person returns to prison again after release.


The algorithm includes constant monitoring of their life, current events and behavioral characteristics. The idea behind the method is based on the provision of special gadgets to the parole. These are smartphones and biometric wearable devices that allow you to control the biological data of each specific carrier.

The devices take pictures and images, monitor health status, register location information. And it all ultimately boils down to training artificial intelligence to identify patterns associated with regression into criminal behavior.

That is a daunting task, but the scientists hope to cope with it, and thus find a way to reduce the growth of crime in society. In addition, they intend to use a new method to help many people to avoid another imprisonment, while taking into account all possible ethical ideas and requirements.


The algorithm they created has already been sent to an expert opinion, and several dozen volunteers agreed to participate in the experiment. One of the researchers, Marcus Roger, noted that the main goal of the study is to identify opportunities for an early intervention to help people to adapt to society after prison.