Coronavirus, wildlife crisis, climate change are interconnected
Coronavirus, wildlife crisis, climate change are interconnected

Coronavirus, wildlife crisis, climate change are interconnected

Coronavirus, wildlife crisis, climate change are interconnected

University of California experts believe that people are currently observing the interconnectedness of different events. The appearance of the coronavirus COVID-19 is associated with environmental problems. Virus, wildlife crisis, climate change are interconnected. Due to human intervention in the wild, coronavirus has appeared. It was transmitted from a bat to humans, causing severe respiratory illness.

Today, close contact has been established between man and nature and it increases the risk of spreading viruses. A study by scientists has provided new data to assess the risk of spreading the animal virus. Researchers concluded that processes that reduce populations in the wild allow viruses to be transmitted to humans.


Christine Kroyder Johnson, one of the researchers, noted that the spread of viruses was a direct result of human actions in the wild. Scientists have collected data on 142 viruses that can spread from animals to humans. They also studied the types of animals from which the virus can be transmitted.

The conclusion is this: livestock shared the largest number of viruses with humans, which is the result of close interaction with species that eventually became domestic. Wild animals that have adapted in an environment dominated by humans also share viruses with humans.

Among these organisms are bats, primates and some species of animals living on farms and agricultural land. Another species is animals that are endangered. Illegal hunting for them, reduction of environmental conditions connected them with a person.