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E-waste overwhelms the planet: by 2030, its volume will reach 75 million metric tons

E-waste overwhelms the planet

In 2019, different territories of our planet were littered with electronics waste. The scientists have calculated - officially, in total, there were about 53.6 million tons. But every day the volume of that waste is growing rapidly. In 2014, there were about 44.4 million metric tons. These were mainly battery powered devices or plug-in devices such as laptops, smartphones, and televisions. The experts' forecasts indicate that the volume of such waste will only increase.

By 2030, they will increase about eight times. Such results were reported by the specialists from the United Nations International Telecommunication Union, the International Solid Waste Association and representatives of other groups to track the accumulation of electronic debris.


The projected e-waste for 2020 and other subsequent years does not include any economic impact that may be associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. The forecasts of specialists say that the annual volume of waste from used electronics will gradually double in comparison with the 2014 figures.

These figures are the result of calculations of global consumption of electronics. Also, for greater accuracy, the researchers used simulations that predict sales, the life of electronic equipment. The projected e-waste for 2020 and other subsequent years does not include any economic impact that may be associated with the COVID-19 pandemic.

The inhabitants of the planet use electronics daily. For many devices, the cycles of periods of their use are significantly reduced, their service life is not long. Given the growing demand, manufacturers have reached the level of equipment operating mode in a short period, so that the buyer acquires such equipment as often as possible.


But most users still do not understand the importance of the recycling process. Of the 53.6 million tons of e-waste generated in 2019, only 9.3 million tons, or 17.4%, were recycled. The rest were thrown into the landfill. Electronic debris contains hazardous chemicals such as mercury, cadmium, chlorofluorocarbons and hydrochlorofluorocarbons. All of them negatively affect the environment.