Earth's magnetic field turned into a slowly spreading dent: NASA is monitoring that

Earth's magnetic field turned into a slowly spreading dent

A dent formed in the Earth's magnetic field. It spreads slowly and the NASA specialists are observing that strange and unusual phenomenon. Images that are taken by the satellites warn that the events could interfere with the operation of the space equipment operating in the orbit of the planet. The Earth's magnetic field is a kind of protective shield. It repels charged cosmic rays and ultraviolet light from the Sun.

But over South America and the South Atlantic Ocean is an unusually weak spot in a field known as the South Atlantic Anomaly. It allows hazardous particles to pass closer to the surface of the Earth than in all other territories.


It is in these territories that frequent failure of computer equipment and low collection of data from the satellites can be observed. The scientists are tracking that anomaly, and it is of the particular interest as changes in the magnetic field strength are observed. They can influence the Earth's atmosphere and serve as an indicator of events taking place in the depths of the globe. Currently, the anomaly has no visible impact on the daily life on the surface.

But recent observations show that the magnetic field is expanding abnormally, representing a spreading dent. At the same time, it moves westward and noticeably weakens. At that point, the magnetic field is divided into two parts, and each creates certain interference in the operation of satellite systems.

Numerous scientists observe and model the anomalous site to track and predict future changes, and also help to prepare for the future events that the anomaly could create for the satellites and people in space. According to one version, the anomaly could arise due to two the features in the Earth's core.


One of them is the tilt of the magnetic axis. The second is the flow of molten metals inside the outer core. Since the movement of the core changes in time due to the complex geodynamic conditions inside, then the magnetic field also begins to fluctuate in time and space. These processes shape near-Earth changes, including creating the observed anomaly.