Nature and climate News | Scientific ecology

Terrible heat will cover the planet in 2070: billions of people will suffer from the heat

Terrible heat will cover the planet in 2070

Researchers, having analyzed the current climate situation, have concluded that after 50 years, about three and a half billion people will be forced to live in a climate that is too hot to handle. Today, about twenty million people live in areas where the average annual air temperature has long gone beyond the existing norms. Such territories today are about one percent of the entire Earth.

They include Mecca, Saudi Arabia, zones near the Sahara desert. But after 50 years, there will be more such zones, and air-conditioned air cooling will become less affordable. The air will become so hot that at least 3.5 billion people will suffer from the heat.


Ecologist Martin Schaeffer explains: this will happen because every year the average air temperature rises by 1.8 degrees worldwide, thereby changing the climate. And every day the number of people living in areas where the climate changes markedly and to live without equipment that cools the air is no longer possible.

According to forecasts, a third of the world's population in 2070 will live in extremely hot conditions. With the mildest variations in the forecast, the number of people who will have to suffer from heat will reach two billion people. The term that environmentalists devote to achieving real forecast indicators is very short.

Cornell University experts express sincere concern for the current situation. They believe that the rate of climate change is set by the person himself. Several hundred years ago, the planet had a completely different climate, and a person could survive in hot and cold places.


But in the future, evading the heat will be more difficult. Already today, about twenty million people live in areas where the average annual temperature is stable at + 29 degrees. As our planet becomes warmer, unbearable living conditions are primarily formed in Africa, Asia, South America, and Australia.