Tools of labor ancient Arabia became an indicator of skill level
Tools of labor ancient Arabia became an indicator of skill level

Tools of labor used in ancient Arabia became an indicator of skill level

Tools of labor ancient Arabia became an indicator of skill level

The experts from the French National Center for Scientific Research at Ohio State University and the Max Planck Institute for Human History have discovered the unique features of the tools used in ancient Arabia. A new research has demonstrated the skills that ancient people possessed. As part of a new study, the scientists were able to discover a new data about the life of people 8 thousand years ago.

They created stone tools that were not only useful, but could also demonstrate the level of skill in making tools to help in everyday life and on the hunt. Among them were spearheads and arrowheads created during the Neolithic period on the territory of modern Yemen.


Independently of each other, the Arabs were able to create a unique way of creating stone tips that were called fluting. It was first used by people in North America thousands of years ago. But there were some key differences from these two methods used in North America and in Arabia.

Anthropology professor Joy McCorriston noted that corrugated arrowheads were used in North America. That method made spears more functional. In Arabia, the method was used to demonstrate their technical skills. In fact, the ancient Arabians simply demonstrated how skillful they were at using complex technology.

The fluted tips found in the territory of Ancient Arabia were called an important discovery. The samples were created about 8 thousand years ago, that is, two thousand years later than those that were created in North America. Before that, nowhere else on the planet were there fluted arrowheads and spears.


The process of making these tips involves the intricate knowledge of how to remove scales from the stone to create a distinctive channel. That is a laborious process that required not only skill, but practice.