Science learned to reproduce memories in real time
Science learned to reproduce memories in real time

Brain under control: science learned to reproduce memories in real time

Science learned to reproduce memories in real time

The scientists learned to control the brain by reproducing human memories in real time. A research from the National Institutes of Health suggests that the human brain has the ability to use various activation models to store and recall memories. The scientists studied patients diagnosed with the epilepsy. They tracked their electrical activity in individual brain cells - neurons. The patients were offered special memory tests.

It turned out that the patterns of cell activation that appear when the patient received new knowledge were reproduced in the brain literally a second before memorization. At the same time, the scientists noted that the experiment was carried out with the most difficult patients whose attacks could not be controlled even with the potent drugs.


Karim Zagul, MD, believes that memory plays a decisive role in a person's life. The brain can write them down like the notes on a stave. And then it stores it in the form of neural impulses, reproducing it over and over again if it is necessary.

The first scientific breakthroughs in this area were outlined in 1957. A patient with epilepsy after surgery lost the memory, thereby stopping the seizures. But the scientists have also been able to recover episodic memory by coding patterns of neural activity.

The brain was able to extract memories based on smells, melody. But then the scientists failed to identify the whole process of what was happening. For nearly twenty years they have been trying to find an answer to this riddle.


Studies in rodents have shown that the brain can store memories in unique neuronal activation sequences. And then it was decided to test that method on humans. The researchers hoped to find a relationship between memory and neuronal arousal patterns. In humans, it is similar to that of rodents.

A research has shown that the brain can use different impulses to store memories and respond to impulses to reactivate them.