Black hole confirms Einstein's theory again
Black hole confirms Einstein's theory again

The black hole confirmed the Einstein's theory once again: it takes quantum corrections into account

Black hole confirms Einstein's theory again

An equation containing an infinite number of terms, with the quantum corrections of the Einstein-Lovelock theory that describes black holes. The scientists from the RUDN University of Russia believe that the geometry of a black hole in theory can be represented in a more compact form and a limited number of terms in that equation may be enough to describe all observed phenomena.

Thus, the scientific world would be able to study black holes with quantum corrections made to the Einstein equations, because of to the theory of relativity, black holes are believed to exist. They can be supermassive objects in the Universe that attract everything, including the light.


Black holes are described by different mathematical models, one of them is the Einstein-Lovelock theory. The quantum corrections available in it introduce data for the development of the general theory of relativity. In that equation, a black hole is represented as the sum of an infinite number of numbers. But the physicists believe that there are only a limited number of terms that could describe the effects observed near the black hole. And other components of the equation can be neglected, since they have an insignificant contribution to its solution.

The Einstein's theory says that heavy objects distort space-time in the form of a four-dimensional structure, there are three spatial quantities and one temporal dimension. In the Einstein-Lovelock equation, the first two terms demonstrate the temporal dimension, and each next one demonstrates the curvature of space-time.

Each term in the equation is multiplied by a coupling constant. The physicists calculated that if you adhere to its positive values, then the corrections for high curvature are cut off. It is because each constant can have its own critical value. After its movement, the black hole loses its stability and means that it cannot exist in reality.


And, from the mathematics' point of view, if this representation is possible then in physics it makes no sense. The more members, the lower the critical value of the coupling constants. Consequently, the stability of black hole and, hence, the possibility of its physical existence, can be used as a criterion for removing unnecessary terms.