Dark matter passes through the wall: scientists conduct a unique experiment

Dark matter passes through the wall

Dark matter passing through a wall, this is a unique experiment that is being conducted by an international team of scientists who intend to organize a search for any light particles. To implement this ambitious plan, the researchers use the tunnel part of the former HERA accelerator. The international ALPS team will search for dark matter using 24 former HERA magnets, laser light and a highly sensitive detector.

The last of the magnets was installed late last week. Today, the experts installed the last detail, which is related to connecting the magnets. Throughout the year, the ALPS II team celebrated the installation of the first magnet in the tunnel.


About a year later, a data collection began for the next plan. A project manager Axel Linder believes that there is already a reason to be proud. When it was previously thought that it was impossible to prepare for that unusual experiment, it turned out that even during the pandemic, there were opportunities for organizing it. During this time, the experts drew up a plan on how to use the tunnel, superconducting magnets, a complex laser system, and a sensitive detector.

And what previously seemed impossible is now taking on real features. The experts believe that once the project is launched, it will be able to give science new discoveries. First of all, the implementation of the project will become the world's first experiment of this kind to detect the dark matter.

The use of telescopes, particle accelerators, underground reservoirs for search and the final results, whatever they may be, is already a sensation, because just one project will provide six times more information about the universe than ever before.


The nature of dark matter is considered as one of the greatest mysteries. The observations and calculations were unable to reveal its real presence in outer space or anywhere else, but they helped to calculate that dark matter makes up 85% of all matter in the Universe.

However, what it consists of is unknown. Hence the term dark matter that is not visible and which practically does not interact with normal matter.